Головна English for Everyone - Level 4 Advanced - Practice Book

English for Everyone - Level 4 Advanced - Practice Book

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First published in Great Britain in 2016 by Dorling Kindersley Limited

Our Practice Book (Level 4) offers great exercises and examples to introduce English at an advanced stage including key language skills, grammar, and vocabulary. Build your confidence and fluency of conversational English.

English for Everyone uses visual teaching methods to introduce practical English usage, reinforced through a variety of exercises and examples in our Practice Book (Level 4).

The Level 4 Practice Book challenges your English experience with topical content covering family life, careers and business, news and media, and even laws, rules, and regulations. As well as continuing to improve your vocabulary, grammar, and punctuation to an advanced level with comprehensive guidance. When used alongside our Course Book (Level 4), this workbook is ideal for English test preparations or ESL lesson plans.

Whether you are looking for ESL teaching resources, or a structured programme for adults to learn English as a second language, the English for Everyone Practice Books provide practice questions and exercises focusing on:

- Grammar: Applying new language rules into different contexts with visual breakdowns of English grammar in use
- Vocabulary: Cement understanding of key English vocabulary with visual cues to help understand the exercises
- Reading: Examine target language topics in real-life English examples to support effective English language learning
- Writing: Improve core understanding of English by producing written passages of English text
- Listening: Test understanding of spoken English with extensive English-speaking audio materials integrated into every unit (All supplementary audio is available on the DK English for Everyone website and IOS/Android App).
- Speaking: ESL learners can practice and compare spoken English with our free online audio resources

The English for Everyone Level 4 resources cover the advanced skills and topics required for all major global English-language exams and reference frameworks including:
- CEFR: upper B2 - C1
- TOEFL (test paper): 520-580
- TOEFL (computer-based test): 200-240
- TOEFL (online test): 70-95
- IELTS: 5.5-7
- TOEIC: 850-900

English for Everyone is a series of guides and practice books that supports English learning for adults from a beginner level, to intermediate, and advanced practical English. Offering an easy-to-follow format that offers guidance for both teaching English as a foreign language, and a self-study approach with resources available to improve English speaking, reading and writing.
Том:
264
Рік:
2016
Видання:
First edition
Видавництво:
DK, Dorling Kindersley
Мова:
english
Сторінки:
264
ISBN 13:
9780241243534
Серії:
English for Everyone
Файл:
PDF, 135,76 MB

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Author
Claire Hart is a freelance author of English-language materials. She
has published a range of print materials and created several online
courses. She also teaches English at the University of Applied
Sciences in Neu-Ulm, Germany.

Course consultant
Tim Bowen has taught English and trained teachers in more than 30
countries worldwide. He is the co-author of works on pronunciation
teaching and language-teaching methodology, and author of
numerous books for English-language teachers. He is currently a
freelance materials writer, editor, and translator. He is a member
of the Chartered Institute of Linguists.

Language consultant
Professor Susan Barduhn is an experienced English-language
teacher, teacher trainer, and author, who has contributed to
numerous publications. In addition to directing English-language
courses in at least four different continents, she has been President
of the International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign
Language, and an adviser to the British Council and the US State
Department. She is currently a Professor at the School
of International Training in Vermont, USA.

ENGLISH
FO R E V E RYO N E
PRACTICE BOOK
ADVANCED
LEVEL

Contents
DK India
Senior Editors Vineetha Mokkil, Anita Kakar
Senior Art Editor Chhaya Sajwan
Project Editor Antara Moitra
Editors Agnibesh Das, Nisha Shaw, Seetha Natesh
Art Editors Namita, Heena Sharma, Sukriti Sobti,
Shipra Jain, Aanchal Singhal
Assistant Editors Ira Pundeer, Ateendriya Gupta,
Sneha Sunder Benjamin, Ankita Yadav
Assistant Art Editors Roshni Kapur,
Meenal Goel, Priyansha Tuli
Illustrators Ivy Roy, Arun Pottirayil, Bharti Karakoti, Rahul Kumar
Picture Researcher Deepak Negi
Managing Editor Pakshalika Jayaprakash
Managing Art Editor Arunesh Talapatra
Production Manager Pankaj Sharma
Pre-production Manager Balwant Singh
Senior DTP Designer Vishal Bhatia, Neeraj Bhatia
DTP Designer Sachin Gupta
Jacket Designer Surabhi Wadhwa
Managing Jackets Editor Saloni Singh
Senior DTP Designer (jackets) Harish Aggarwal
DK UK
Editorial Assis; tants Jessica Cawthra, Sarah Edwards
Illustrators Edwood Burn, Denise Joos, Michael Parkin,
Jemma Westing
Audio Producer Liz Hammond
Managing Editor Daniel Mills
Managing Art Editor Anna Hall
Project Manager Christine Stroyan
Jacket Designer Natalie Godwin
Jacket Editor Claire Gell
Jacket Design Development Manager Sophia MTT
Producer, Pre-Production Luca Frassinetti
Producer Mary Slater
Publisher Andrew Macintyre
Art Director Karen Self
Publishing Director Jonathan Metcalf
First published in Great Britain in 2016 by
Dorling Kindersley Limited
80 Strand, London, WC2R 0RL
Copyright © 2016 Dorling Kindersley Limited
A Penguin Random House Company
10 8 6 4 2 1 3 5 7 9
001–290006–Jun/2016
All rights reserved.
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval
system, or transmitted, in any form, or by any means (electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording, or otherwise), without the prior written
permission of the copyright owner.
A CIP catalogue record for this book
is available from the British Library.
ISBN: 978-0-2412-4353-4
Printed and bound in China
All images © Dorling Kindersley Limited
For further information see: www.dkimages.com

A world of ideAs:
SEE All ThERE IS To Know
www.dk.com

How the course works

Making conversation

8
12

New language Present tenses
Vocabulary Meeting new people
New skill Using question tags

Action and state verbs

16

New language State verbs in continuous forms
Vocabulary Action and state verbs
New skill Describing states

Using collocations

18

New language Collocations
Vocabulary Beliefs and opinions
New skill Talking about your life

Complex descriptions

22

New language General and specific adjectives
Vocabulary Personalities
New skill Ordering adjectives

Making general statements

26

New language Introductory “it”
Vocabulary Talents and abilities
New skill Expressing general truths

Vocabulary Travel and tourism

29

Phrasal verbs

30

New language Phrasal verbs overview
Vocabulary Travel
New skill Using complex phrasal verbs

Narrative tenses

34

New language The past perfect continuous
Vocabulary Travel adjectives and idioms
New skill Talking about a variety of past actions

Giving advice and opinions

38

New language Modals for advice and opinion
Vocabulary Recommendations
New skill Giving advice and opinions

Making predictions
New language Degrees of likelihood
Vocabulary Idioms about time
New skill Talking about possibilities

42

Vocabulary Family and relationships

45

Using discourse markers

46

New language Linking information
Vocabulary Family history
New skill Talking about relationships

Past habits and states

50

54

58

61

Taking notes

62

New language Organizing information
Vocabulary Academic life
New skill Taking notes
66

Complex verb patterns

86

Double object verbs

90

Vocabulary Meeting and presenting

93

Reflexive pronouns

94

Meeting and planning

98

New language Combining verbs
Vocabulary Office tasks
New skill Taking part in meetings
70

New language The passive voice
Vocabulary Online learning
New skill Changing sentence emphasis

Things that might happen

82

New language Reflexive pronouns
Vocabulary Workplace language
New skill Talking about work issues

New language Generalization
Vocabulary Approximate quantity phrases
New skill Talking about numbers

New language “What if,” “suppose,” “in case”
Vocabulary Exams and assessment
New skill Talking about hypothetical situations

Asking polite questions

New language Double object verbs
Vocabulary New businesses
New skill Talking about starting a business

Vocabulary Studying

Changing emphasis

78

New language Verb + infintive / gerund
Vocabulary World of work
New skill Using complex verb patterns

New language Two comparatives together
Vocabulary Age and population
New skill Expressing cause, effect, and change

Speaking approximately

Job applications

New language Direct and indirect questions
Vocabulary Job interviews
New skill Asking questions politely

New language “As... as” comparisons
Vocabulary Adjective-noun collocations
New skill Comparing and contrasting

Two comparatives together

77

New language Prepositions and gerunds
Vocabulary Job applications
New skill Writing a résumé and cover letter

New language “Used to” and “would”
Vocabulary Family values
New skill Contrasting the past with the present

Comparing and contrasting

Vocabulary Working

Qualifying descriptions

102

New language Non-gradable adjectives
Vocabulary Qualifying words
New skill Adding detail to descriptions
74

Expressing purpose
New language “In order to,” “so that”
Vocabulary Language of apology
New skill Expressing purpose

106

Vocabulary Environmental concerns

109

Conditional tenses

110

New language The third conditional
Vocabulary Environmental threats
New skill Talking about an unreal past

Past regrets

114

118

122

125

Past possibility

126

New language “Might / may / could” in the past
Vocabulary Urban myths
New skill Talking about past possibility
130

Adding emphasis

148

Shifting focus

152

Vocabulary Crime and the law

155

Relative clauses

156

More relative clauses

160

New language Where, when, whereby, whose
Vocabulary Courtroom phrases
New skill Using relative words
133

New language Mixed conditionals
Vocabulary Personality traits
New skill Talking about hypothetical situations

Adding “-ever” to question words

144

New language Relative clauses
Vocabulary Crime and criminals
New skill Specifying and elaborating

New language More uses for modal verbs
Vocabulary Phrasal verbs with “out”
New skill Speculating and making deductions

New language Words with “-ever”
Vocabulary Chance and weather phrases
New skill Joining a clause to a sentence

Making indirect statements

New language Focusing with clauses
Vocabulary Phrases for emphasis
New skill Shifting focus

Vocabulary Tradition and superstition

Mixed conditionals

140

New language Inversion after adverbials
Vocabulary Media and celebrity
New skill Adding emphasis to statements

New language “Few,” “little,” “fewer,” “less”
Vocabulary Nature and environment
New skill Describing quantities

Speculation and deduction

Reporting with passives

New language Indirect statements
Vocabulary Hedging language
New skill Expressing uncertainty

New language Dependent prepositions
Vocabulary Actions and consequences
New skill Changing sentence stress

Few or little?

139

New language Passive voice for reporting
Vocabulary Reporting language
New skill Distancing yourself from facts

New language “Should have” and “ought to have”
Vocabulary Time markers
New skill Expressing regret about the past

Actions and consequences

Vocabulary Media and celebrity

Modal verbs in the future

164

New language “Will be able to,” “will have to”
Vocabulary Legal terms
New skill Expressing future ability and obligation
136

Modal verbs overview
New language Using modal verbs
Vocabulary Modal verbs
New skill Asking, offering, and predicting

168

Vocabulary Customs and cultures

171

Talking about groups

172

New language Using adjectives as nouns
Vocabulary Countries and nationalities
New skill Generalizing politely

Old and new situations

176

180

Future hopes

184

187

The future in the past

Expressing reactions

Getting things done

188

192

New language Complex agreement
Vocabulary Collective nouns
New skill Using the correct agreement

196

New language “So” and “such” for emphasis
Vocabulary Medical science
New skill Emphasizing descriptions

200

New language Generic “the”
Vocabulary Exploration and invention
New skill Using advanced articles

Complex agreement

“So” and “such”

New language The future perfect
Vocabulary Life plans
New skill Making plans and predictions

New language “Would” and “was going to”
Vocabulary Changing plans
New skill Saying what you thought

Shortening infinitives

New language “Have / get something done”
Vocabulary Services and repairs
New skill Describing things people do for you

New language The future continuous with “will”
Vocabulary Polite requests
New skill Planning your career

The future perfect

Substituting words

208

212

216

New language Informal discourse markers
Vocabulary Advanced prefixes
New skill Structuring conversation

New language “Wish” with “would” or “could”
Vocabulary Hopes for the future
New skill Talking about future hopes and wishes

The future continuous

204

New language Reduced infinitives
Vocabulary Music and performance
New skill Avoiding repetition

New language Concrete and abstract nouns
Vocabulary Education systems
New skill Talking about abstract ideas

Vocabulary Technology and the future

Leaving words out

New language Substitution
Vocabulary Books and reading
New skill Replacing phrases

New language Articles
Vocabulary Commonly misspelled words
New skill Saying words with silent letters

Abstract ideas

203

New language Ellipsis
Vocabulary Entertainment
New skill Leaving out unneccessary words

New language “Be used to” and “get used to”
Vocabulary Moving and living abroad
New skill Talking about old and new situations

Articles

Vocabulary Art and culture

Using articles to generalize

Answers

220

224

228

232

236

How the course works
English for Everyone is designed for people who want to teach
themselves the English language. Like all language courses, it
covers the core skills: grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation,
listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Unlike in other
courses, the skills are taught and
Conditional tenses
practiced as visually as possible, using
images and graphics to help you
understand and remember. The practice
book is packed with exercises designed to
reinforce the lessons you have learned in
the course book. Work through the units
in order, making full use of the audio
available on the website and app.
You can use the third conditional to describe an unreal past,
or events that did not happen. This is useful for talking
about regrets you have about the past.

Conditional tenses
You can use the third conditional to describe an unreal
past, or events that did not happen. This is useful for
talking about regrets you have about the past.

FILL IN THE GAPS BY PUTTING THE VERBS IN THE CORRECT TENSES
TO MAKE SENTENCES IN THE THIRD CONDITIONAL

New language The third conditional
Vocabulary Environmental threats
New skill Talking about an unreal past

KEY LANGUAGE THE THIRD CONDITIONAL
THIRD CONDITIONAL

SECOND CONDITIONAL

Use the third conditional to describe
unreal situations in the past.

The second conditional is used to
describe unreal situations in the present.

KEY LANGUAGE FORMAL INVERSION
You can make the
third conditional
more formal by
inverting the
subject and “had,”
and dropping “if.”

HOW TO FORM THE THIRD CONDITIONAL
say the sentences out loud using the contracted forms
“IF”

New language The third conditional
Vocabulary Environmental threats
New skill Talking about an unreal past

“HAD” + PAST PARTICIPLE

Using different modals varies the
certainty of the imagined result.

The “if “ clause is the
unreal past condition.

FILL IN THE GAPS BY PUTTING THE VERBS IN THE CORRECT TENSES
TO MAKE SENTENCES IN THE THIRD CONDITIONAL

“WOULD / COULD / MIGHT”

Unit number The book is divided
into units. Each practice book unit tests
the language taught in the course book
unit with the same number.

This is used more in formal and
academic written English.

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MARK THE THINGS
THAT ACTUALLY HAPPENED

The conditional clause
is the unreal result.

ANOTHER WAY TO SAY THE THIRD CONDITIONAL
The past perfect continuous can also
follow “if ” in the third conditional.

Often “have” is contracted
when spoken.

Sentences in the third conditional can be reordered
without a comma so the “if ” clause is second.

124

125

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors
124-129_289759_EFE_32.indd 124

22/01/2016 10:45 124-129_289759_EFE_32.indd 125

110

110-113_Unit32_Adv_Conditional_tenses.indd 110

“HAVE” + PAST PARTICIPLE

22/01/2016 10:45

PRACTICE BOOK

111

27/01/16 4:27 pm 110-113_Unit32_Adv_Conditional_tenses.indd 111

COURSE BOOK

27/01/16 5:48 pm

Practice points Every unit
begins with a summary of
the key practice points.

The future perfect
You can use the future perfect to talk about events
that will overlap with, or finish before, another event
in the future.

rewrite the highlighted
phrases, correcting the errors
New language The future perfect
Vocabulary Life plans
New skill Making plans and predictions

fill in the gaps bY putting the verbs in the future perfect

Modules Each unit
is broken down into
modules, which should be
done in order. You can take
a break from learning after
completing any module.

say the sentences out loud, filling in

196

8

196-199_Unit59_Adv_The_Future_perfect.indd 196

25/01/16 10:46 pm

196-199_Unit59_Adv_The_Future_perfect.indd 197

Vocabulary Throughout the book,
vocabulary pages test your memory
of key English words and phrases
taught in the course book.

read the eMail and answer
the Questions

Visual practice Images and
graphics offer visual cues to help
fix the most useful and important
English words in your memory.

Vocabulary
TRAVEL AND TOURISM write the phrases froM the panel
under the correct definitions

respond out loud to the audio, filling in the gaps in
the answers

29

28

Audio support Most modules have
supporting audio recordings of native
English speakers to help you improve
your speaking and listening skills.

n the gaps

197

FREE AUDIO
website and app
www.dkefe.com
9

Practice modules
Each exercise is carefully graded to drill
and test the language taught in the
corresponding course book units.
RewRite the sentenCes, CORReCting the eRRORs
Working through
the exercises alongside
the course book will help you remember
what you have learned and become
more fluent. Every exercise is introduced
with a symbol to indicate which skill is
being practiced.

GRAMMAR
Apply new language rules
in different contexts.

VOCABULARY
Cement your understanding
of key vocabulary.

READING
Examine target language
in real-life English contexts.

SPEAKING
Compare your spoken English
to model audio recordings.

LISTENING
Test your understanding
of spoken English.

Module number Every module is identified
with a unique number, so you can easily
locate answers and related audio.

Exercise instruction Every exercise
is introduced with a brief instruction,
telling you what you need to do.

fill in the gaps BY pUtting the VeRBs in the pResent peRfeCt
OR the pResent peRfeCt COntinUOUs

MARK the sentences thAt ARe coRRect

Space for writing You are
encouraged to write your answers
in the book for future reference.

Making predictions
When you talk about a future event, you might need
to say how likely it is that the event will happen. There
are a number of ways that you can do this.

Supporting audio This symbol shows
that the answers to the exercise are
available as audio tracks. Listen to them
New language Degrees of likelihood
Vocabulary Idioms aboutafter
time completing the exercise.
New skill Talking about possibilities
13

maTch
The beginnings of The senTences To The correcT endings
Supporting graphics
Visual
sAy the sentences out loud, putting “so” oR “such” in the
cues are given to help you
coRRect plAce
understand the exercises.

012-015_Unit1_Adv_Making_conversation.indd 13

22/01/16 6:26 pm

Sample answer The
first question of each
exercise is answered for
you, to help make the
task easy to understand.

Listening exercise
This symbol indicates
that you should listen to
an audio track in order
to answer the questions
in the exercise.

231

Speaking exercise
This symbol indicates that you should
say your answers out loud, then
compare them to model recordings
included in your audio files.

LisTen To The audio and mark WheTher
each acTiviTy is
228-231_Unit68_Adv_so_and_such.indd
231 LikeLy
or unLikeLy To happen

25/01/16 3:17 pm

42

10

042-044_Unit10_Adv_Making_predictions.indd 42

22/01/16 10:32 pm

Audio

Answers

English for Everyone features extensive
supporting audio materials. You are
encouraged to use them as much as you can,
to improve your understanding of spoken
English, and to make your own accent and
pronunciation more natural. Each file can be
played, paused, and repeated as often as you
like, until you are confident you understand
what has been said.

An answers section at the back of the book lists the
correct answers for every exercise. Turn to these
pages whenever you finish a module and compare
your answers with the samples provided, to see how
well you have understood each teaching point.

Answers Find the
answers to every
exercise printed at
the back of the book.

LISTENING EXERCISES
This symbol indicates that you should
listen to an audio track in order to
answer the questions in the exercise.

SUPPORTING AUDIO
This symbol indicates that extra audio
material is available for you to listen to
after completing the module.

Audio This symbol
indicates that the
answers can also be
listened to.

Exercise numbers
Match these numbers
to the unique identifier
at the top-left corner
of each exercise.

FREE AUDIO
website and app
www.dkefe.com
11

Making conversation
Verbs have various forms in the present tense, including
continuous and perfect. You need to understand these
differences when making question tags.

MARK the sentences thAt ARe coRRect

12

New language Present tenses
Vocabulary Meeting new people
New skill Using question tags

RewRite the sentenCes, CORReCting the eRRORs

fill in the gaps BY pUtting the VeRBs in the pResent peRfeCt
OR the pResent peRfeCt COntinUOUs

13

match the StatemeNtS to the correct queStioN tagS

LiSteN to the audio aNd aNSwer the queStioNS
heather miller, a well-known travel
writer, is being interviewed.

14

Say the SentenceS out loud, adding the correct queStion tagS

15

Action and state verbs
Verbs that describe actions or events are known as
“action” or “dynamic” verbs, whereas those that describe
states are known as “state” or “stative” verbs.

Mark whether each
Verb describes an action
or a state

16

New language State verbs in continuous forms
Vocabulary Action and state verbs
New skill Describing states

Mark the sentences
that are correct

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

say the sentences out loud, putting the verbs in the
correct tense

17

Using collocations
Collocations are often formed of two words, but
can contain more. Using them will make you a
more fluent English speaker.

New language Collocations
Vocabulary Beliefs and opinions
New skill Talking about your life

fill in thE gaps to ComplEtE thE sEntEnCEs

18

read the article and answer the questions

19

rewrite the sentences, putting the words in the correct order

Listen to the audio and match the images of the events
to the correct time

20

cross out the incorrect words in each sentence

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

21

Complex descriptions
When you describe something using more than one
adjective, the adjectives usually have to go in a specific
order. There are several categories of adjectives.

New language General and specific adjectives
Vocabulary Personalities
New skill Ordering adjectives

reWriTe The senTences, correcTing The errors

22

find eight opinion adjectives in the grid and write them
under the correct heading
general opinion

specific opinion

fill in the gaps, putting the adjectives in the correct order

23

fill in the gaps using the prefixes in the panel

listen to the audio and answer the questions
richard and Jenni are talking about filling
a job vacancy in their company.

24

read the performance review and answer the questions
as full sentences

25

Making general statements
It is very useful to know how to start sentences with the
word “it” in English. You can use “it is” at the beginning of
a sentence to make a general statement about something.

New language Introductory “it”
Vocabulary Talents and abilities
New skill Expressing general truths

FIll In thE gaps usIng thE phrasEs In thE panEl

26

cross out the incorrect words in each sentence

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

27

READ thE EmAil AnD AnswER
thE quEstions

REsponD out louD to thE AuDio, filling in thE gAps in
thE AnswERs

28

Vocabulary
TRAVEL AND TOURISM WRITE THE PHRASES FROM THE PANEL
UNDER THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

29

Phrasal verbs
Phrasal verbs occur in many different forms. They have
two or more parts, which are sometimes separable.
They are very common, especially in spoken English.

rEwriTE ThE sEnTEncEs,
PuTTing ThE words in ThE
corrEcT ordEr

30

New language Phrasal verbs overview
Vocabulary Travel
New skill Using complex phrasal verbs

MArK ThE sEnTEncEs
ThAT ArE corrEcT

rewrite the sentences, separating the phrasal verbs

rewrite the sentences Using prOnOUns

31

say the sentences out loud, filling in the gaps

tip

remember that
when you’re saying a
three-part phrasal
verb, you
need to stress the
second word.

fill in the gaps by putting the verbs in the correct tenses

32

read the article and answer the questions

33

Narrative tenses
When telling a story, even if you’re just talking about
something that happened recently, you need to use a
variety of tenses so that the story can be understood easily.

New language The past perfect continuous
Vocabulary Travel adjectives and idioms
New skill Talking about a variety of past actions

fill in the gaps by putting the verbs in the past simple
or past continuous

34

COMPLETE THE SENTENCES USING THE PAST PERFECT, SPEAKING
OUT LOUD

FILL IN THE GAPS by PUTTING THE vERbS IN THE bRACKETS INTO
THE PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

35

fill in the gaps BY pUtting the verBs in the panel
in the COrreCt tense

matCh the Beginnings Of the sentenCes tO the COrreCt endings

36

read the article and write answers to the questions
as full sentences

37

Giving advice and opinions
When you want to give advice or make recommendations,
you can use a variety of modal verbs. You can vary the
strength of your advice by using different modals.

New language Modals for advice and opinion
Vocabulary Recommendations
New skill Giving advice and opinions

mark aLL The recommendaTions

LisTen To The audio and mark The revieW ThaT
mosT cLoseLY maTches charLoTTe’s opinion

38

Fill in the GaPs with the recommendations From the Panel

listen to the audio and mark whether victor liked or disliked
each activity

39

saY the sentences out loud, choosing the coRRect woRds

Read the email and answeR the questions

40

writE a lEttEr rEcommEnding a trip using thE phrasEs
in thE panEl

41

Making predictions
When you talk about a future event, you might need
to say how likely it is that the event will happen. There
are a number of ways that you can do this.

New language Degrees of likelihood
Vocabulary Idioms about time
New skill Talking about possibilities

maTch The beginnings of The senTences To The correcT endings

LisTen To The audio and mark WheTher each acTiviTy is LikeLy
or unLikeLy To happen

42

cross out the incorrect word in each sentence

say the sentences out loud, filling in the gaps using
the words in the panel

43

read the article and answer the questions

44

Vocabulary
FAMILY AND RELATIONSHIPS WRITE THE PHRASES FROM THE PANEL
UNDER THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

45

Using discourse markers
Discourse markers can be used to show a relationship
between two sentences, or parts of a sentence. This can
be cause, effect, emphasis, contrast, or comparison.

New language Linking information
Vocabulary Family history
New skill Talking about relationships

maTch The beginnings of The senTences To The correcT enDings

46

cross out the incorrect words in each sentence

47

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

choose the most appropriate discourse markers, then say the
sentences out loud

48

read the article and answer the questions

49

Past habits and states
When you talk about habits or states in the past, you can
use “used to” or “would.” English often uses these forms
to contrast the past with the present.

New language “Used to” and “would”
Vocabulary Family values
New skill Contrasting the past with the present

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, CORRECTING THE ERRORS

50

MARK the sentences thAt ARe coRRect

RewRite the highlighted phRAses, coRRecting the eRRoRs

Listen tO the aUdiO and answeR the qUestiOns
Jack and his mother are discussing
the benefits of the internet.

Listen again and MaRK the MOst aCCURate sUMMaRy

fiLL in the gaps Using the wORds in the paneL

52

correct the errors in the sentences, then say them out loud

reWrite each sentence usinG “Would” or “used to”

53

Comparing and contrasting
Using “as… as” is a very flexible way to make comparisons.
You can use it to compare and contrast quantities and
qualities of people, objects, situations, and ideas.

New language “As… as” comparisons
Vocabulary Adjective–noun collocations
New skill Comparing and contrasting

Fill in the gaps Using the expressions in the panel

tip

You will need to
use some of the
phrases more
than once.

54

listen to the audio and answer the questions
two coffee shops, Frank’s and morello’s,
are being compared.

mark the sentences that are correct

55

fill in the gaps using the collocations from the panel

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

56

read the BLOG and write answers tO the questiOns
as fuLL sentences

57

Two comparatives together
You can use two comparatives in a sentence to show the
effect of an action. You can also use them to show that
something is changing.

New language Two comparatives together
Vocabulary Age and population
New skill Expressing cause, effect, and change

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

rewrite the sentences, putting the words
in the correct order

58

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

59

listen to the audio and answer the questions
linda bumps into her old friend Chloe.
they talk about their busy lives.

fill in the gaps using the phrases in the panel

60

Vocabulary
STUDYING WRITE THE PHRASES FROM THE PANEL UNDER THE
CORRECT DEFINITIONS

61

Taking notes
Discourse markers can help you to organize language
to make it easier for the listener or reader to follow.
Listening for them is very useful when taking notes.

New language Organizing information
Vocabulary Academic life
New skill Taking notes

Match the Discourse Markers to their synonyMs

Match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct enDings

62

listen to the audio and answer the questions
a university professor is addressing a group of first-year
students who have just enrolled at the university.

read the email and put the discourse markers into the
correct categories
sequencing

adding

examples

concluding

rewrite the first conditional sentences, correcting the errors

64

match thE bEginnings of thE sEntEncEs to thE corrEct Endings

listEn to thE audio and mark thE corrEct summary
a counselor at a university is informing
students about the options available
to them for their year abroad.

65

Speaking approximately
English has a number of useful phrases to describe
approximate quantities and amounts. You can use them
when a number is unknown or roughly accurate.

New language Generalization
Vocabulary Approximate quantity phrases
New skill Talking about numbers

MATCH THE PICTURES TO THE CORRECT DESCRIPTIONS

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORDS IN EACH SENTENCE

66

read the email and answer the questions

67

fill in the gaps using the words and phrases in the panel

68

listen to the audio and answer the questions

respond to the audio, Filling in the gaps in the sentences

69

Changing emphasis
There are a number of ways that you can change emphasis
in English. One way is to use a less common grammatical
structure, such as the passive voice.

New language The passive voice
Vocabulary Online learning
New skill Changing sentence emphasis

REad ThE blOg pOsT and chOOsE ThE bEsT summaRy

70

cross out the incorrect words in each sentence

rewrite the sentences using the passive voice

71

Say the SentenceS out loud uSing the wordS
from the panel

72

tip

nouns formed
from phrasal verbs
are spoken with
the stress on the
first syllable.

Read the aRticle and answeR the questions

match the beginnings of the sentences to the coRRect endings

73

Things that might happen
There are many ways to talk about hypothetical future
situations. You can use different structures to indicate
whether you think a hypothesis is likely or unlikely.

New language “What if,” “suppose,” “in case”
Vocabulary Exams and assessment
New skill Talking about hypothetical situations

MATCH THE SITUATIONS TO THE LIKELY CONSEQUENCES

MARK WHETHER THE OUTCOMES ARE LIKELY OR UNLIKELY

74

Cross out the inCorreCt verb form in eaCh sentenCe

fill in the gaps by putting the verbs in the CorreCt tenses

75

RESPOND TO THE AUDIO OUT LOUD, SAYING WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN

76

Vocabulary
WORKING WRITE THE PHRASES FROM THE PANEL
UNDER THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

77

Job applications
In English, prepositions can only be followed by
a noun phrase or a gerund. This is particularly
important when talking about the order of events.

New language Prepositions and gerunds
Vocabulary Job applications
New skill Writing a résumé and cover letter

fIll In ThE gaps usIng ThE words In ThE panEl

78

read the JOB adVertisement and write answers tO the
questiOns as full sentences

79

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

fill in the gaps using the phrases in the panel

80

MARK THE MORE FORMAL SENTENCE IN EACH PAIR

81

Asking polite questions
In English, asking questions directly can sometimes be
seen as impolite. It is very common for English speakers
to make their questions more indirect.

New language Direct and indirect questions
Vocabulary Job interviews
New skill Asking questions politely

REWRITE THE DIRECT QUESTIONS AS INDIRECT QUESTIONS

82

REWRITE THE INDIRECT QUESTIONS, PUTTING THE WORDS IN THE
CORRECT ORDER

Say THE DIRECT QUESTIONS OUT lOUD aS INDIRECT QUESTIONS

83

MATCH THE QUESTIONS TO THEIR ANSWERS WITH
STALLINg TECHNIQUES

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS
Mr. James is interviewing Rose for the
position of Head of Communications.

84

RESPOND TO THE AUDIO, SPEAKING OUT LOUD AND ADDING
APPROPRIATE STALLING PHRASES FROM THE PANEL

85

Complex verb patterns
There are several different patterns that verbs can follow,
including whether they can be followed by an infinitive
or a gerund.

New language Verb + infinitive / gerund
Vocabulary World of work
New skill Using complex verb patterns

rewriTe The senTences, correcTing The errors

86

cross out the incorrect words in each sentence

read the article and answer the questions

87

fill in the gaps using the words in the panel

88

MARK the sentences thAt ARe coRRect

ReAd the eMAil And AnsweR
the questions

89

Double object verbs
Some verbs can be followed by both a direct object and
an indirect object. Sentences using these verbs can be
ordered in a number of different ways.

New language Double object verbs
Vocabulary New businesses
New skill Talking about starting a business

rewrite the SentenceS, correcting the errorS in the
order of the wordS

90

rewrite the sentences, putting the words in the correct order

MAtch the sentences thAt describe the sAMe event

91

read the blog and answer the questions

fill in the gaps using the idioms in the panel

92

Vocabulary
MEETING AND PRESENTING WRITE THE PHRASES FROM THE PANEL
UNDER THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

93

Reflexive pronouns
Reflexive pronouns show that the subject of a verb
is the same as its object. They can also be used in
other situations to add emphasis.

New language Reflexive pronouns
Vocabulary Workplace language
New skill Talking about work issues

fill in The gaps using Reflexive pRonouns

94

cross out the incorrect word in each sentence

saY the sentences out Loud, FiLLinG in the GaPs with the
correct reFLeXiVe Pronouns

95

fill in thE gaps Using thE rEflEXiVE pronoUns in thE panEl

match thE bEginnings of thE sEntEncEs to thE corrEct Endings

96

reWrITe The senTences, correcTIng The errors

97

Meeting and planning
Many verbs can be followed by another verb.
This can be a “to” infinitive (“want to eat”) or
a gerund (“enjoy cooking”).

New language Combining verbs
Vocabulary Office tasks
New skill Taking part in meetings

fill in The gaps using The verbs in The panel

98

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

cross out the incorrect word in each sentence

99

match the definitions to the highlighted verbs

mark the sentences that are correct

100

rewrite the sentences, putting the words in the correct order

sAY the sentences out Loud, FiLLing in the gAps with the
correct Form oF the verbs

101

Qualifying descriptions
There are many ways to qualify or add further
detail to adjectives. Some types of adjectives
can only be modified in certain ways.

New language Non-gradable adjectives
Vocabulary Qualifying words
New skill Adding detail to descriptions

FILL IN THE GAPS USING THE WORDS IN THE PANEL

102

mark the sentences that are correct

cross out the incorrect word in each sentence

103

RESPOND TO THE AUDIO, SPEAKING OUT LOUD AND FILL IN THE GAPS
USING THE WORDS IN THE PANEL

MATCH THE BEGINNINGS OF THE SENTENCES TO THE CORRECT ENDINGS

104

READ THE pRoDucT DEscRipTion AnD AnsWER THE QuEsTions

105

Expressing purpose
There are a number of ways to express the purpose of,
or reason for, an action. You use different expressions to
describe the purpose of an object.

New language “In order to,” “so that”
Vocabulary Language of apology
New skill Expressing purpose

maTch The beginnings of The senTences To The correcT endings

106

rewrite the sentences using “so that” to join them together

fill in the gaps using “for” or “to”

107

say the sentences out loud, choosing the correct words

108

Vocabulary
ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS WRITE THE PHRASES
FROM THE PANEL UNDER THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

109

Conditional tenses
You can use the third conditional to describe an unreal past,
or events that did not happen. This is useful for talking
about regrets you have about the past.

New language The third conditional
Vocabulary Environmental threats
New skill Talking about an unreal past

FILL IN THE GAPS BY PUTTING THE VERBS IN THE CORRECT TENSES
TO MAKE SENTENCES IN THE THIRD CONDITIONAL

110

say the sentences out loud using the contracted forms

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

111

read the News story aNd aNswer the questioNs

112

cross out the incorrect words in each sentence

fill in the gaps using an “i wish” or an “if onlY” sentence

113

Past regrets
You can use “should have” or “ought to have” to talk
about past mistakes. they both signal that you wish
you had done something differently in the past.

New language “Should have” and “ought to have”
Vocabulary Time markers
New skill Expressing regret about the past

fill in the gaps using “should,” “should not,” or “ought”

tip

“ought not to…”
is not incorrect,
but is not
commonly used.

114

match the pictures to the sentences

115

rewrite the sentences, putting the words in the correct order

116

read the cLues and write the answers in the correct
pLaces on the grid

Listen to the audio and fiLL in the gaps using
the words in the paneL

117

Actions and consequences
Unlike many parts of speech, prepositions often have
little meaning in themselves, but work to change the
meaning of the words around them.

New language Dependent prepositions
Vocabulary Actions and consequences
New skill Changing sentence stress

FILL IN THE GAPS USING THE DEPENDENT PREPOSITION PHRASES
IN THE PANEL

118

fill in the gaps using the correct prepositions

read the blog and answer
the questions

cross out the incorrect prepositions

unDerLine the WorDs You neeD to stress AnD sAY eAch
sentence out LouD

120

REWRITE THE HIGHLIGHTED PHRASES, CORRECTING THE ERRORS

121

Few or little?
The words used to describe quantities vary according to
a number of factors, including whether you are talking
about something countable or uncountable.

New language “Few,” “little,” “fewer,” “less”
Vocabulary Nature and environment
New skill Describing quantities

cross ouT The incorrecT words in each senTence

122

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

mark the sentences
that are correct

listen to the audio and
answer the questions
stuart brookes is fighting to save the
endangered red squirrel.

123

fill in the gaps using “few” or “bit”

cross out the incorrect words in each sentence

124

Vocabulary
TRADITION, LUCK, AND SUPERSTITION WRITE THE PHRASES
FROM THE PANEL UNDER THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

125

Past possibility
You can use a variety of language to talk about possible
events in the past, and to indicate whether you agree or
disagree with speculation.

New language “Might / may / could” in the past
Vocabulary Urban myths
New skill Talking about past possibility

cross out the incorrect words in each sentence

126

match the pictures to the correct sentences

127

marK the sentences that are correct

rewrite these statements using reported speech

128

rewrite the questions as reported questions usinG “i asKed”

write reported questions to match the answers

129

Speculation and deduction
You can use modal verbs to describe past events with
varying degrees of certainty. These constructions are
useful for speculating about events you haven’t witnessed.

New language More uses for modal verbs
Vocabulary Phrasal verbs with “out”
New skill Speculating and making deductions

rewriTe The senTences, correcTing The errors

130

MATCH THE PAIRS OF SENTENCES TOGETHER

CROSS OuT THE INCORRECT wORdS IN EACH SENTENCE

131

fill in the gaps by putting the verbs in the correct form

listen to the audio and
answer the questions
Jason and valerie are talking about
their colleague richard, who they
cannot find in the office.

132

Mixed conditionals
You can use different types of conditional statements to
talk about hypothetical situations. Mixed conditionals
use more than one of these types in the same statement.

New language Mixed conditionals
Vocabulary Personality traits
New skill Talking about hypothetical situations

fill in the gaps Using the phrases in the panel

133

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

fill in the gaps by putting the verbs in the panel in
the correct tense

134

rewrite the mixed conditional sentences, correcting the
highlighted errors

135

Adding “-ever” to question words
Adding “-ever” to question words changes their
meaning. These new words modify the question
words to mean “no matter” or it “doesn’t matter.”

New language Words with “-ever”
Vocabulary Chance and weather phrases
New skill Joining a clause to a sentence

fill in The gAps using The words in The pAnel

136

cross out the incorrect word in each sentence

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

137

match the definitions to the phrases

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

138

Vocabulary
MEDIA AND CELEBRITY WRITE THE PHRASES FROM THE
PANEL UNDER THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

139

Reporting with passives
One way to distance yourself from facts is to use the
passive voice and reporting verbs. This device is
commonly used in newspaper and television journalism.

New language Passive voice for reporting
Vocabulary Reporting language
New skill Distancing yourself from facts

fill in The gaps using The wOrds in The panel

140

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

cross out the incorrect words in each sentence

141

mark the sentences that are correct

listen to the audio and answer the questions
a business news channel is reporting on the
latest grants announced by the government.

142

rewrite the sentences using the passive voice

143

Making indirect statements
Sometimes you may wish to avoid giving definite facts
or personal opinions. This is known as “hedging.” Certain
words and indirect statements can help you with this.

New language Indirect statements
Vocabulary Hedging language
New skill Expressing uncertainty

fill in The gapS uSing The wordS and phraSeS in The panel

144

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

say the sentences out loud, choosing the correct Words

145

read the article and write answers to the questions
as full sentences

146

Listen to the audio and answer the questions
a news item on the radio talks about a
criminal who made a foolish mistake.

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

147

Adding emphasis
You can add emphasis, or even a sense of drama,
to a statement through grammar and pronunciation.
Inversion is one effective way to do this.

New language Inversion after adverbials
Vocabulary Media and celebrity
New skill Adding emphasis to statements

cross out the Incorrect words In each sentence

match the begInnIngs of the sentences to the
correct endIngs

148

mark the sentences that are correct

using the prompts, rewrite the sentences
to shift the emphasis

149

fill in the gaps using the phrases in the panel

150

Listen to the audio and answer the questions
a news station is reporting on a fire
that broke out during an awards
ceremony in Los angeles.

rewrite the sentences, putting the words in
the correct order

151

Shifting focus
You can add emphasis to part of a sentence in English
by splitting it into two clauses. This allows you to focus
attention on the the new or important information.

New language Focusing with clauses
Vocabulary Phrases for emphasis
New skill Shifting focus

REwRiTE ThE sEnTEncEs using “whaT” clausEs To changE
ThE focus

152

fill in the gaps using the words in the panel

Cross out the inCorreCt words in eaCh sentenCe

153

MAtch the questions to the coRRect AnsweRs

MARK the sentences thAt ARe coRRect

154

Vocabulary
CRIME AND THE LAW WRITE THE PHRASES FROM THE PANEL
UNDER THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

155

Relative clauses
Relative clauses are sections of a sentence that provide
more information about a noun in the main statement.
They can be defining or non-defining.

New language Relative clauses
Vocabulary Crime and criminals
New skill Specifying and elaborating

mARk wHETHER THE RELATIVE PRONOUN IS THE SUbjECT OR
THE ObjECT Of THE RELATIVE CLAUSE

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT RELATIVE PRONOUN IN EACH SENTENCE

156

fill in the gaps with a correct relative pronoun

match up the parts of the sentences

157

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, addINg CommaS WHERE NECESSaRy

Say THE SENTENCES ouT loud, CoRRECTINg THE ERRoRS

158

read the article and answer the questions

159

More relative clauses
Relative words define or describe a noun in the main
part of the sentence. Different relative words are used
depending on the nouns that they relate to.

New language Where, when, whereby, whose
Vocabulary Courtroom phrases
New skill Using relative words

cRoss out the incoRRect woRDs in each sentence

160

fill in the gaps using the words in the panel and “where,”
“when,” or “whereBY”

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

161

Listen to the audio and MaRK the coRRect suMMaRy

RewRite the sentences using “whose”

162

read the article and answer the questions

163

Modal verbs in the future
Some modal verbs change form when used to talk about
the future. Others cannot be used in the future at all, and
have to be replaced with other modal verbs or phrases.

New language “Will be able to,” “will have to”
Vocabulary Legal terms
New skill Expressing future ability and obligation

REWRITE THESE SENTENCES, makINg THEm REFER TO THE FUTURE

164

rewrite the sentences, putting the words in the correct order

fill in the gaps to complete the sentences, referring
to the future

165

cross out the incorrect phrase in each sentence

Listen to the audio and write answers to the questions
in fuLL sentences
Mr. hall is talking to Mrs. cooper
about her son peter's performance
at school.

166

read the article and answer the questions

167

Modal verbs overview
Modal verbs are used to talk about likelihood, ability,
permission, and obligation, among other things.
They often refer to hypothetical situations.

New language Using modal verbs
Vocabulary Modal verbs
New skill Asking, offering, and predicting

Fill in The gaps using The words in The panel

168

Cross out the inCorreCt words in eaCh sentenCe

MatCh the beginnings of the sentenCes to the CorreCt endings

169

Mark the sentences that are correct

rewrite the sentences, correctinG the errors

170

Vocabulary
CUSTOMS AND CULTURES WRITE THE PHRASES FROM THE PANEL
UNDER THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

171

Talking about groups
Sometimes you may want to talk generally about
groups of people or different nationalities. It is
important that you know the correct way to do this.

New language Using adjectives as nouns
Vocabulary Countries and nationalities
New skill Generalizing politely

WrIte the correct nameS for the dIfferent groupS of people

match the begInnIngS of the SentenceS to the correct endIngS

172

fill in the gaps using the words in the panel

173

MARK the sentences thAt ARe coRRect

174

RESPOND TO THE AUDIO, SPEAKING OUT LOUD

175

Old and new situations
New situations may seem unusual, but over time they
become familiar. You can use phrases that contain “be
used to” and “get used to” to talk about this.

New language “Be used to” and “get used to”
Vocabulary Moving and living abroad
New skill Talking about old and new situations

cross out the iNcorrect word iN each seNteNce

176

fill in the gaps using the correct forms of “be” and “get”

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

177

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

listen to the audio and answer the questions
a man is talking about moving to a new
country and getting used to life there.

178

say the sentences out loud, filling in the gaps

rewrite the highlighted
phrases, correcting the errors

Articles
Articles are some of the shortest and yet most common
words in the English language. There are several rules
stating which article, if any, should be used.

New language Articles
Vocabulary Commonly misspelled words
New skill Saying words with silent letters

cross ouT ThE incorrEcT words in EAch sEnTEncE

180

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

181

fill in the gaps using the correct articles, leaving
a blank for zero article

182

listen to the audio and answer the questions
George and carla are talking about the
different countries where they have lived.

Mark the silent letters and say the sentences out loud

183

Abstract ideas
Most abstract nouns are uncountable. Some, however,
can be either countable or uncountable, and the two
forms often mean slightly different things.

New language Concrete and abstract nouns
Vocabulary Education systems
New skill Talking about abstract ideas

croSS out the incorrect word in each Sentence

184

fill in the gaps using the words in the panel

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

185

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

186

Vocabulary
TECHNOLOGY AND THE FUTURE WRITE THE PHRASES FROM THE
PANEL UNDER THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

187

Future hopes
To talk about wishes for the future, usually when you
want something to change, you use the past tense
modals “would” and “could.”

New language “Wish” with “would” or “could”
Vocabulary Hopes for the future
New skill Talking about future hopes and wishes

rewriTe The senTences, correcTing The errors

188

fill in the gaps using “could” or “would”

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

189

say the sentenCes out Loud, fiLLing in the gaps with
“CouLd” or “wouLd”

Listen to the audio and answer the questions
Cheryl is talking to her boss
Michael about her job.

190

read the email and write answers to the questions
as full sentences

191

The future continuous
You can use the future continuous with “will” to make
predictions about the future, and also to speculate about
what might be happening at the current moment.

New language The future continuous with “will”
Vocabulary Polite requests
New skill Planning your career

fill in the gaps bY putting the verbs in the future continuous
with “will”

192

use the chart to create 12 correct sentences and
say them out loud

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

193

rewrite the sentences, putting the words in the correct order

listen to the audio and answer the questions
charles is calling rachel to
find out where Bill is.

194

read the article and answer the questions

195

The future perfect
You can use the future perfect to talk about events
that will overlap with, or finish before, another event
in the future.

New language The future perfect
Vocabulary Life plans
New skill Making plans and predictions

fill in the gaps bY putting the verbs in the future perfect

196

rewrite the highlighted
phrases, correcting the errors

say the sentences out loud, filling in the gaps

197

rewrite the sentences using the future perfect continuous

198

MarK the sentences that are correct

rewrite the highlighted phrases, correcting the errors

The future in the past
English uses a number of constructions to
describe thoughts about the future that we
had at some point in the past.

New language “Would” and “was going to”
Vocabulary Changing plans
New skill Saying what you thought

cross out thE incorrEct words in Each sEntEncE

MarK thE sEntEncEs that arE corrEct

200

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

Listen to the audio and mark whether the events
reaLLy happened or not

201

rewrite the sentences using future in the past tenses

202

Vocabulary
ART AND CULTURE WRITE THE PHRASES FROM THE PANEL UNDER
THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

203

Leaving words out
When you want to communicate clearly, it can
be helpful to avoid repetition. One way to do
this is to drop any unnecessary words.

New language Ellipsis
Vocabulary Entertainment
New skill Leaving out unnecessary words

crOss Out the WOrds that can be left Out Of each sentence

204

read the article and answer the questions

205

fill in the gaps with the repeated words
that have been dropped

listen to the audio and answer the questions
rachel and simon are talking in
the movie theater, waiting for
the film to start.

206

cross out the incorrect word in each sentence

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

207

Substituting words
As well as ellipsis (leaving words out), you can also avoid
repeating yourself by replacing some phrases with
shorter ones. This is called substitution.

New language Substitution
Vocabulary Books and reading
New skill Replacing phrases

cross ouT The incorrecT word in eAch senTence

208

Fill in the gaps using “one,” “ones,” or “some”

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

209

MAtch the beginnings of the sentences to the coRRect endings

MARK the sentences thAt ARe coRRect

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Listen to the audio and answer the questions
Michael is talking to
Kristen about an expensive
smartwatch he got as a gift.

resPond out Loud to the audio, usinG suBstitution

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Shortening infinitives
As well as ellipsis and substitution, you can also shorten
(or “reduce”) infinitives to prevent repetition. This will
help you to sound more natural when speaking.

New language Reduced infinitives
Vocabulary Music and performance
New skill Avoiding repetition

Cross ouT All The words ThAT you CAn leAve ouT

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rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

listen to the audio and answer the questions
Paul and Jess are discussing a concert
they would like to go to.

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match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

fill in the gaps using the words in the panel

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rewrite the sentences, putting the words in the correct order

respond to the audio out loud, using the prompts

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Expressing reactions
Although discourse markers often don’t add content in
themselves, they can ease the flow of a conversation and
add information about the speaker’s opinion.

New language Informal discourse markers
Vocabulary Advanced prefixes
New skill Structuring conversation

cross out the leAst AppropriAte words in eAch sentence

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Respond to the Audio, speAKinG out loud And fillinG
in the GAps with the woRds in the pAnel

MARK the sentences thAt ARe coRRect

217

read the article and
answer the questions

Match the deFinitions to the correct words

218

fill in the gaps using the pRefiXes in the panel

219

Getting things done
Sometimes you might want to talk about other people
doing things for you, rather than doing things yourself.
To do this, you need to use different grammar.

New language “Have / get something done”
Vocabulary Services and repairs
New skill Describing things people do for you

maTch The beginningS of The SenTenceS To The correcT endingS

reWriTe The SenTenceS, PUTTing The WordS in The correcT order

220

listen to the audio and answer the questions

fill in the gaps using the correct forms of the verbs

221

rewrite the highlighted
phrAses, cOrrecting the errOrs

rewrite the sentences, using “hAVe” Or “get”

222

Respond out loud to the audio, using the phRases in the panel

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Complex agreement
One of the basic principles of English is that subjects and
verbs must agree. Some subjects, however, can behave
as singular or plural nouns depending on their context.

New language Complex agreement
Vocabulary Collective nouns
New skill Using the correct agreement

Fill in thE gapS uSing thE cOllEctivE nOunS in thE panEl

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MARK the sentences thAt ARe coRRect

MAtch the beginnings of the sentences to the coRRect endings

225

cross out the incorrect words in each sentence

listen to the audio and answer the questions
neil, a student, is talking about a popular
subject in college.

226

say the sentences out loud, choosing the correct words

227

‘‘So’’ and ‘‘such’’
You can use “so” and “such” with certain words to
add emphasis. They are similar in meaning, but they
are used in different structures.

New language “So” and “such” for emphasis
Vocabulary Medical science
New skill Emphasizing descriptions

cross ouT The incorrecT words in each senTence

228

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

fill in the gaps using “so” or “such”

229

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

230

MARK the sentences thAt ARe coRRect

sAy the sentences out loud, putting “so” oR “such” in the
coRRect plAce

231

Using articles to generalize
“The” is the most commonly used word in the English
language. It can be used in many different situations,
as can the indefinite article “a,” and the zero article.

New language Generic “the”
Vocabulary Exploration and invention
New skill Using advanced articles

cross ouT ThE IncorrEcT words In Each sEnTEncE

232

fill in the gaps using the correct article, leaving a gap
for zero article

MarK the sentences that are correct

233

rewrite the sentences, correcting the errors

234

match the beginnings of the sentences to the correct endings

rewrite the sentences, putting the words in the correct order

235

Answers

236

Model Answers

GENERAL OPINION:
nice, lovely, bad, awful
SPECIFIC OPINION:
kind, sad, ugly, tasty

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Model Answers

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Model Answer
Model Answers

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Model Answers

241

SEQUENCING: first, second, third
EXAMPLES: for example, for instance, such as
ADDING: additionally, moreover
CONCLUDING: to sum up, overall,
in conclusion

242

Model Answers

Model Answers

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Model Answers

244

Model Answers

245

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Model Answers

252

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Model Answers

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Model Answers

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Model Answers

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Model Answers

258

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Acknowledgments
The publisher would like to thank:
Jo Kent, Trish Burrow, and Emma Watkins
for additional text; Thomas Booth, Helen
Fanthorpe, Helen Leech, Carrie Lewis, and
Vicky Richards for editorial assistance;
Stephen Bere, Sarah Hilder, Amy Child,
Fiona Macdonald, and Simon Murrell for
additional design work; Simon Mumford for
maps and national flags; Peter Chrisp for fact
checking; Penny Hands, Amanda Learmonth,
and Carrie Lewis for proofreading; Elizabeth
Wise for indexing; Tatiana Boyko, Rory
Farrell, Clare Joyce, and Viola Wang for

264

additional illustrations; Liz Hammond for
editing audio scripts and managing audio
recordings; Hannah Bowen and Scarlett
O’Hara for compiling audio scripts; Richard
Hughes and Jordan Killiard for mixing
and mastering audio recordings; Heather
Hughes, Tommy Callan, Tom Morse, Gillian
Reid, and Sonia Charbonnier for creative
technical support; Priyanka Kharbanda,
Suefa Lee, Shramana Purkayastha, Isha
Sharma, Sheryl Sadana for editorial support;
Yashashvi Choudhary, Jaileen Kaur, Bhavika
Mathur, Richa Verma, Anita Yadav, Apurva

Agarwal for design support; Deepak Negi and
Nishwan Rasool for picture research; Rohan
Sinha for managerial and moral support.
DK would like to thank the following for their
kind permission to reproduce photographs:
19 Peter Cook (c) Dorling Kindersley, Courtesy
of the Pima Air and Space Museum, Tuscon,
Arizona (center). 146 Dreamstime.com:
Smellme (top right).
All other images are copyright DK. For more
information, please visit www.dkimages.com